Politics

Net zero plan needs to ‘spell out’ costs of existing technologies


The Grattan Institute’s Energy Program Director Tony Wood says there is a “large gap” between the government’s net zero by 2050 plan and what the plan should actually look like. 

“It’s intended to develop technologies that are not yet ready for deployment, bring those costs down, and ensure that they can be developed as we need them,” Mr Wood told Sky News Australia.

“However, it’s not a plan to get to net zero by 2050 because it doesn’t spell out how we will pay for the technologies that will still cost some money.”

He questioned what the government will do about those things which will not require new technology, such as coal and motor vehicles. 

“There’s a very large gap between what this is, and what a plan to get us to net zero by 2050 would actually look like.”

The Grattan Institute’s Energy Program Director Tony Wood says there is a “large gap” between the government’s net zero by 2050 plan and what the plan should actually look like.

“It’s intended to develop technologies that are not yet ready for deployment, bring those costs down, and ensure that they can be developed as we need them,” Mr Wood told Sky News Australia.

“However, it’s not a plan to get to net zero by 2050 because it doesn’t spell out how we will pay for the technologies that will still cost some money.”

He questioned what the government will do about those things which will not require new technology, such as coal and motor vehicles.

“There’s a very large gap between what this is, and what a plan to get us to net zero by 2050 would actually look like.”
The Grattan Institute’s Energy Program Director Tony Wood says there is a “large gap” between the government’s net zero by 2050 plan and what the plan should actually look like.

“It’s intended to develop technologies that are not yet ready for deployment, bring those costs down, and ensure that they can be developed as we need them,” Mr Wood told Sky News Australia.

“However, it’s not a plan to get to net zero by 2050 because it doesn’t spell out how we will pay for the technologies that will still cost some money.”

He questioned what the government will do about those things which will not require new technology, such as coal and motor vehicles.

“There’s a very large gap between what this is, and what a plan to get us to net zero by 2050 would actually look like.”

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